When I talk to other designers about accessibility, they frequently shrug and say things like: “I use the Color Contrast Tool, so I’m compliant.” That’s appreciated more than “the dev team takes care of that and there is some kind of checklist they follow. I don’t really know, it’s not my job.

If you venture out into your bigger team, a project manager might express concern that your company can “get sued because of ADA lawsif your product doesn’t meet accessibility standards or they just don’t see a business case. …


For the last few years, I’ve been a user experience researcher on an enterprise software platform. Because this platform is very powerful, flexible and complex — learning how to use it can require some effort. Even after years of exposure to the various capabilities and their use cases, I find I still learn something new. I expect that won’t change. I won’t pretend that I know all the ‘ins and outs’ of all the features or all of their supporting use cases. It can take years of on-hands experience to gain that level of knowledge!

Successful design requires teamwork and collaboration!

The problem at hand…

As a design researcher tasked…


Someone recently asked me how I managed to stay in my chosen career of design for so long. As a creative person, they asked, how did I deal with avoiding creative burn-out? How did I know that I would end up where I’ve found myself? Wasn’t I bored doing the same thing for so long? Was it true that all designers did was to play video games?

Let’s start with the easy question… Nope! Designers don’t play video games all day. Another urban myth debunked. To answer those harder questions, let’s start at the beginning…

When I was in second…

Hope Turner

Senior User Experience Designer & Researcher@ IBM

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